Video games and the brain

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Playing video games may increase your brain's gray matter and improve how it communicates

video games and the brain

Your brain on video games - Daphne Bavelier

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In 'Fortnite: Battle Royale,' players have a showdown to see who can be the last one left alive. Video games are one of the most popular and commonly enjoyed forms of entertainment of our time, yet there's a lot of controversy around them. Some people have also suggested there are links between playing video games and violent behavior, especially in the wake of tragic events like the school shooting in Parkland, Florida. But many other people have pointed out that some types of games offer benefits, including the potential to improve people's ability to pay attention and process visual information. For all of these reasons, people have lots of questions surrounding what science says about the effects of video games.

By: Vince May 9, AM. In fact, several studies which we'll get to in a second support the findings. But yes, real research from credible sources has shown that playing video games actually does have health benefits—both for the brain and the body. To start, recent studies completed by several noted research and scientific organizations have proven that playing video games could help improve the quality of life for the disabled and mentally ill. Hedwig-Krankenhaus in Berlin, Germany, found that playing video increases grey matter basically, the size of your brain and helps refine learned and hardwired skills.

Research studies suggest that there is a link between playing certain video games and improved decision making abilities and cognitive flexibility. There is an observable difference between the brain structure of individuals who play video games frequently and those who don't. Video gaming actually increases brain volume in areas responsible for fine motor skill control, the formation of memories, and for strategic planning. Video gaming could potentially play a therapeutic role in the treatment of a variety of brain disorders and conditions resulting from brain injury. Hedwig-Krankenhaus has revealed that playing real-time strategy games, such as Super Mario 64, can increase the brain's gray matter. Gray matter is the layer of the brain that is also known as the cerebral cortex.

It's official, gaming can, and does, change the brain of gamers. But it's not all for the good. It appears the jury is in, gaming does affect the brain in gamers. They have improved visuospatial skills, memory, attention and, it turns out, show signs of other brain change associated with some addictive disorders. Whilst games tend to get bad press whenever something anti-social happens amongst "youths", it appears games are not the culprit.



Playing Video Games Is Good For Your Brain – Here’s How

Whether playing video games has negative effects is something that has been debated for 30 years, in much the same way that rock and roll, television, and even the novel faced much the same criticisms in their time. - For full functionality, it is necessary to enable JavaScript.

How Playing Video Games Affects Your Body And Brain

Having you ever found yourself groggy and disoriented after a long session of gaming, as if coming out of a deep trance? Where was I? What effect might this persistent engagement have on our cognitive faculties? There are plenty of scientific studies about this topic. The results are generally positive, sometimes negative. Most of the results concern functional aspects of the brain: perception , memory , peripheral vision , and reaction time. But instead of looking at the precise, low-level mechanical details of what we think, we should look at the big, messy, emergent features of how we think: concepts and communication, our habits and norms, and our models of the world and how we apply them.

Well, according to the results of a study published in Nature , gaming could possibly be the way forward. Researchers from the Chinese University of Electronic Science and Technology and the Australian Macquarie University in Sydney joined forces, and recently found a correlation between playing action video games and increased gray matter volume in the brain. The focus of the team's research was on the insular cortex, a part of the cerebral cortex folded deep in the brain that has been the subject of very few studies to date.

How Video Games Affect Brain Function

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2 thoughts on “Video games and the brain

  1. Video games get a lot of bad press at times, but it appears gaming can alter the brain for the good. But it might come at a cost.

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